My Dear Valentine

Famous Friendship Poems

Of all the intricate human relations, human beings treasure friendships the most. Knowing no age barriers, sex barriers, caste barriers and no boundaries, friendship is relation which simply bonds. Famous friendship poems reflect these very aspects of friendship.

For an everlasting friendly relation any amount of thorns and barriers are overcome by true friends. Famous friendship poems signify the importance of friends and their relation in this world life.

How immensely valued and carefully nurtured is the friendship cultivated and nurtured till it blossoms into a full fledge and strong bond is clearly understood from single reading of any of the famous friendship poems.Famous friendship poems express the in depth feelings of friends who leave bittersweet memories of friendship.

Famous friendship poems are beautifully express feelings and essence of true friendship. Some of the famous poets express have written on broken friendship poems, thank you friend poem, sorry friendship poems and funny friendship poems as well.

These poems help us reinvent our friendly relations with long lost friends who may have grown apart due to distances or ill feelings or too busy to stay in touch as well. A simple email or note reminding of the bygone days of beautiful and happy friendly moments works wonders at such times.

A famous friendship poem which expresses these very feelings and stretches again a hand of friendship will definitely be received well and undoubtedly lead to a warm handshake and friendly hugs beginning a new chapter in lives of long lost friends.

Friends, long lost or new can express their feeling in number of ways, still since centuries down we have treasured many famous friendship poems which still hold true today with changing times and can be used to re kindle old friendly ties.

Some of them being Auld Lang Syne by Robert Burns, May Our Friendship Last Forever by Nicholas Gordon, Friendship Sonnet by William Shakespeare, A Bottle and Friend by Robert Burns, When You are Old by William Butler Yeats, A Time to Talk by Robert Frost and Tack by Ralph Waldo Emerson

Auld Lang Syne by Robert Burns

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And auld lang syne?

For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne,
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

And surely ye'll be your pint-stowp,
And surely I'll be mine!
And we'll tak a cup o' kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne,
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

We twa hae run about the braes,
And pu'd the gowans fine;
But we've wandered mony a weary fit
Sin' auld lang syne.

For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne,
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

We twa hae paidled i' the burn,
Frae morning sun till dine;
But seas between us braid hae roared
Sin' auld lang syne.

For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne,
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

And there's a hand, my trusty fiere,
And gie's a hand o' thine!
And we'll tak a right guid-willie waught

For auld lang syne.

For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne,
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.



Only a Curl by Elizabeth Barrett Browning

I.

FRIENDS of faces unknown and a land
Unvisited over the sea,
Who tell me how lonely you stand
With a single gold curl in the hand
Held up to be looked at by me, --

II.

While you ask me to ponder and say
What a father and mother can do,
With the bright fellow-locks put away
Out of reach, beyond kiss, in the clay
Where the violets press nearer than you.

III.

Shall I speak like a poet, or run
Into weak woman's tears for relief ?
Oh, children ! -- I never lost one, --
Yet my arm 's round my own little son,
And Love knows the secret of Grief.

IV.

And I feel what it must be and is,
When God draws a new angel so
Through the house of a man up to His,
With a murmur of music, you miss,
And a rapture of light, you forgo.

V.

How you think, staring on at the door,
Where the face of your angel flashed in,
That its brightness, familiar before,
Burns off from you ever the more
For the dark of your sorrow and sin.

VI.

'God lent him and takes him,' you sigh ;
-- Nay, there let me break with your pain :
God 's generous in giving, say I, --
And the thing which He gives, I deny
That He ever can take back again.



Sonnet 30 by By William Shakespeare

When to the session of sweet silent thought
I summon up remembrance of things past,
I sigh the lack of many a thing I sought,
And with old woes new wail my dear time's waste:
Then can I drown an eye, unused to flow,
When to the session of sweet silent thought
I summon up remembrance of things past,
I sigh the lack of many a thing I sought,
And with old woes new wail my dear time's waste:
Then can I drown an eye, unused to flow,
For precious friends hid in death¹s dateless night,
And weep afresh love's long since cancelled woe,
And moan the expense of many a vanish¹d sight:
Then can I grieve at grievances foregone,
And heavily from woe to woe tell o'er
The sad account of fore-bemoaned moan,
Which I new pay as if not paid before.
But if the while I think on thee, dear friend,
All losses are restored and sorrows end.



Friendships Mystery, To My Dearest Lucasia by Katherine Philips

Come, my Lucasia, since we see
That miracles Men's Faith do move,
By wonder and by prodigy
To the dull angry World let's prove
There's a Religion in our Love.

For Though we were design'd t'agree,
That Fate no liberty destroys,
But our Election is as free
As Angels, who with greedy choice
Are yet determin'd to their joys.

Our hearts are doubled by the loss,
Here Mixture is Addition grown;
We both diffuse, and both ingross:
And we whose minds are so much one,
Never, yet ever are alone.

We court our own Captivity
Than Thrones more great and innocent:
`Twere banishment to be set free,
Since we wear fetters whose intent
Not Bondage is but Ornament

Divided joys are tedious found,
And griefs united easier grow:
We are our selves but by rebound,
And all our Titles shuffled so,
Both Princes, and both Subjects too.

Our Hearts are mutual Victims laid,
While they (such power in Friendship lies)
Are Altars, Priests, and Off'rings made:
And each Heart which thus kindly dies,
Grows deathless by the Sacrifice.



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